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THOMAS REISINGER

Supervisor in the cold forming area, orking for SBER for more than 25 years.

How would you rate your successful career in TUBACEX / SBER Group?

In 1987, I started my first job as an apprentice with VEW - SBER Predecessor Company - training workshop.

After training as an installation assembler, my career took me to the drawing plant where I worked as a maintenance mechanic.

In 2002, I started working my way up to management and was made foreman at the Pilger mill.

Once my professional training was completed, I felt vocationally drawn to Pilger mills where I could contribute with my accumulated expertise and extended experience to improve and update installations. This allowed us, for example, to integrate a sawing line in the 3-inch cold Pilger rolling mill which translated into a clear efficiency increase.

What have been the most important personal changes for you in TUBACEX / SBER since you joined the company?

The main change I think, it was how I reached a managerial position.

There is a great difference between being a mechanic, respected by everyone because he/she repairs and keeps the installation tuned; and being the boss, who also has to carry out unattractive tasks.

Obviously, your standpoint also changes as responsibility increases.

What personal experiences do you take with you of your time at TUBACEX / SBER?

Professional life is full of ups and downs but regardless of how negative a situation may look, you should never stop being positive. It's always too early to give up. This attitude has always worked very well for me.

What's the best thing that has happened to you at TUBACEX/SBER?

First, when I was working as a foreman for a short time, I traveled with my boss to the plant in Spain to share experiences with my Spanish counterparts. It was my first work trip abroad and I felt very important. That was definitely a highlight.

What do you hope for the future?

Tubes (demanded by our customers) are getting increasingly special. In the future, there will be no money to be made with standard products. The challenge is growing for each group and therefore for each worker.

What would be your advice for young people?

Being ambitious, hard-working and honest you can go far.